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Posts Tagged ‘Melissa Stoller’

 

world kindness day

Above image compliments of Random Acts of Kindness  #worldkindnessday  #makekindnessthenorm

November 13, is World Kindness Day. I’m happy to share that my latest picture book, The Weed That Woke Christmas: The Mostly True Tale of the Toledo Christmas Weed, has been listed on the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) recommended reading list for books about kindness. And it is in good company. I will share a few of my friends’ books that are on the list below. But, I hope you will check out all the books on the list here.

Weed cover better quality for social media

Because I was only allowed one entry, my book An Old Man and His Penguin: How Dindim Made João Pereira de Souza an Honorary Penguin isn’t on the list. But it is also about kindness.

Cover 9781732893566 (1) - Copy

I’m not going to get too carried away talking about kindness because I found a good place for that. The Random Acts of Kindness site has resources for educators and anyone interested in making the world a better place. They have kindness ideas, quotes, posters, videos, stories, and more.

kindness ideas

Above image compliments of Random Acts of Kindness  #worldkindnessday  #makekindnessthenorm

In addition, click here to read their inspiring blog post “Make Kindness the Norm.”

THE CONTEST

I will kick off the Random Acts of Kindness Contest by offering a couple prizes for the contest.

Art of Arc V3

writing for children webinars and courses

We will have a first place and a second place winner. The winners of the contest will win their choice of the following prizes. The first place winner will get first pick, and the second place winner will choose from the remaining prizes.

• Complimentary access to my picture book writing course Art of Arc
• The collection of my webinars currently available at this date
• A signed copy of An Old Man and His Penguin: How Dindim Made João Pereira de Souza an Honorary Penguin
• A copy of Who Will? Will You? (also on the SCBWI recommended reading list)

cover from bwp site

What do you need to do?

  1. For the rest of the month of November, carry out a random act of kindness.
  2. Comment on this post by sharing what you chose to do for someone else (the random act of kindness).
  3. Share this post in social media.
  4. With your comment, include where you shared the post link.
  5. 1-4 are requirements to be entered in the contest. Number five is just a favor. Please, if you have any of my books and you like them, I would be very grateful for reviews on Amazon, Goodreads and anywhere else you might prefer.

The contest will be over at midnight central time on December 1, 2020. The first place winner will be chosen by Alayne’s choice of the best random act of kindness, and second place will be chosen via a drawing. I will announce winners within two weeks from the end of the contest.

A Flood of Kindness 51B-NZpo0rL._SX473_BO1,204,203,200_In addition to my friends’ books about kindness (at the end of this post) and those on the SCBWI reading list, I’d like to do one more random act of kindness. My friend Ellen Leventhal’s wonderful picture book A Flood of Kindness is available for pre-order and will be released in April 2021. I’ve ridden along with her as she had her writing journey for this book, and I can attest to its excellence. The book was inspired by Ellen’s personal experiences with floods in Houston, with the most devastating being the result of Hurricane Harvey.

“The night the river jumped its banks, everything changed.”

So begins A Flood of Kindness, a poignant picture book that addresses grief and loss and demonstrates how kindness can bring hope. The story is written in beautifully lyrical spare prose and told from an intimate first-person point of view. Ellen has filled the story with heart and readers “feel” Charlotte’s experience as they follow her watching floodwaters rise in her home until she is forced to evacuate to a shelter with her parents.

I believe Blythe Russo’s fabulous art is going to bring even more emotion to the story, as we “see” what Charlotte experiences.

Some of my friends’ books about kindness.

See the SCBWI reading list for more. 

Authors: Dozens of Doughnuts Carrie Finnison, Ready, Set, Gorilla Melissa Stoller, Be Kind Pat Zietlow Miller, Finding Kindness Deborah Underwood

Author Illustrators: Hedgehog Needs a Hug Jen Betton, Hugsby Dow Phumiruk 

Illustrators: Brianne Farley, Sandy Steen Bartholomew, Jen Hill, Irene Chan

Doughnuts_front_cover_web-1-originalReady-Set-GOrilla-Cover-72dpi-originalBe_Kind-original Pat MillerHedgehog_jacket-front-sm-original jen bentoncover-10-original DowKindness-cover-original debrah underwood

 

Good luck with the contest, and remember kindness makes the world go round!

kindess believe there is good in the world

Above image compliments of Random Acts of Kindness  #worldkindnessday  #makekindnessthenorm

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Lydia Lukidis is on Fire! And . . . No Bears Allowed Book Trailer

LydiaLudikis2 Head shot

Lydia Lukidis is a children’s author with over thirty-four books and eBooks published, a dozen educational books as well as numerous short stories, poems and plays. She writes fiction and nonfiction for ages 3-12. Her background is multi-disciplinary and spans the fields of literature, science and puppetry.

Lydia is passionate about spreading the love for literacy. She regularly works with children in elementary schools across Quebec through the Culture in the Schools program giving literacy and writing workshops. In addition to her creative work, she enjoys composing educational activities and curriculum aligned lesson plans.

Why is Lydia on fire? She’s been blazing the blog and podcast trail talking about her latest picture book No Bears Allowed and giving writing and publishing tips to writers and children. I initially thought I would interview Lydia myself, but I decided why not just share all the fantastic interviews she’s already featured in? So you will find the links below, beginning with her feature on the wonderful Tara Lazar’s blog, and then moving on to the podcast interview with Jed Doherty and more!

Before we move on to Lydia’s interviews, I’d like to share a sampling of her fun book in the trailer below.

 

Here’s what Midwest Reviews has to say about No Bears Allowed: “. . . As Rabbit gets to know one real Bear, he discovers the roots of prejudice and changes his mind about generalizations. . . These excellent revelations encourage kids to face their fears and think about not just the reality of danger, but different personalities and choices involved in interacting with the world with notions that don’t stem from personal experience. Tara J. Hannon’s whimsical, fun, colorful drawings enhance a fine picture book story highly recommended for either independent pursuit by ages 4-7, or read-aloud pleasure.” —Diane Donovan, Sr. Reviewer, Midwest Reviews

Following is a Kirkus review, “A bespectacled rabbit gets over his fear of bears and finds a new friend in this picture book. . . . Young readers may be familiar with the theme of appearances being deceiving and frightening-looking creatures turning out to be benevolent. But Lukidis’ (A Real Live Pet!, 2018, etc.) clever framework that allows Rabbit a moment to be a hero, despite his trepidation, is a nice touch. The story, which features an all-male cast, is told in approachable vocabulary. . . . This adventure offers an effective brain exercise in graphic storytelling for young readers . . .”

 

No Bears Allowed is available for pre-orders at most of your favorite online stores. And it’s on sale at Book Depository with free shipping around the world.

Lydia’s Interviews

Lydia shares her publishing timeline on Tara Lazar’s blog.

Lydia gives all kinds of writing tips and discusses No Bears Allowed on Jed Doherty’s Podcast Jedlie’s Reading With Your Kids.

Lydia answers Melissa Stoller’s three questions about stories, creativity, and connections.

Lydia talks with Sherri Jones Rivers about No Bears Allowed on the GROG Blog.

To learn more about Lydia, her books and her workshops, visit her website where you’ll also find free worksheets for teachers and kids and resources for writers.

In my next blog post, I’ll be interviewing Tara J. Hannon, the illustrator of No Bears Allowed. And she will be giving lots of tips to illustrators.

Visit Blue Whale Press for more information or to see our other children’s books.

 

Actibity book cover

 

Teachers, parents, and kids,

Request the No Bears Allowed free activity book with puzzles, worksheets, and coloring pages by contacting Alayne (click contact tab at top of page) or Lydia or Blue Whale Press

 

 

 

You can find No Bears Allowed at the following stores and more.

Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/No-Bears-Allowed-Lydia-Lukidis/dp/0981493890/

Books-A-Million

https://www.booksamillion.com/p/No-Bears-Allowed/Lydia-Lukidis/9780981493893?id=7593314550667

Barnes & Noble

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/no-bears-allowed-lydia-lukidis/1131677601?ean=9780981493893

Book Depository

https://www.bookdepository.com/No-Bears-Allowed-Lydia-Lukidis-Tara-J-Hannon/9780981493893

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Melissa bookThe Winner

The winner of Melissa Stoller’s giveaway is Jane Heitman Healy! Congratulations, Jane, you have won a signed copy of The Enchanted Snow Globe: Return to Coney Island.

 

Tara Lazar’s Upcoming Guest Post

Tara bannerI’m excited to share that next week, the one and only Tara Lazar will share some of her expertise regarding how to leave room for the picture book illustrator.

More – Lots of resources for chapter book writers

  • Do you have a chapter book idea, but don’t know where to start?
  • Do you have a chapter book idea, but feel something is missing in your first draft?
  • Do you have a chapter book that you’ve been unable to finish?

Grog bannerIf you answered “yes” to any of the above, you might want to check out my guest post on the GROG blog I Have a Chapter Book Idea – Now What? The post is full of chapter book writing resources and my own checklist for developing or editing your chapter book.

sienna-cover-1butterfly kisses cover

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Before I share Melissa’s wonderful post, there are a few things I want to announce.

The winners of my book and critique giveaways are Cathy Ogren and Kim Delude. Cathy has won a copy of Sienna, the Cowgirl Fairy: Trying to Make it Rain. Kim has won a critique on the first three chapters of her chapter book. Congratulations! Thank you to all who participated in the giveaway by commenting and sharing the link.

September is Chapter Book Challenge Lite month (a.k.a. ChaBooCha Lite). This is another chance for writers to challenge themselves, and to give themselves a deadline for writing a book. The goal is to write the first draft of an early reader, chapter book, middle grade book or YA novel within a month. Want to join the fun? Sign up here.

 

I am pleased to have my friend, Spork sister, and fellow Chapter Book Challenge member Melissa Stoller as a guest blogger today. She is offering a chance to win your choice of a copy of her book, The Enchanted Snow Globe Collection: Return to Coney Island, or a chapter book critique (first three chapters), or a picture book critique. All you have to do is comment. Be sure that your name is on the comment.

TOP TEN FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING TO WRITE A CHAPTER BOOK VERSUS A PICTURE BOOK

by Melissa Stoller

My debut chapter book, THE ENCHANTED SNOW GLOBE COLLECTION: RETURN TO CONEY ISLAND, released from Clear Fork Publishing shortly after Alayne’s chapter book, SIENNA THE COWGIRL FAIRY: TRYING TO MAKE IT RAIN. I enjoyed following Alayne’s posts about the differences between picture books and chapter books here and here. And I blogged about writing chapter books as well here and here.

Melissa with book

When Alayne asked me to comment further about this topic, I wondered what I could add that would be new and fresh. I decided that a Top Ten List would do the trick. So here goes:

TOP TEN FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING TO WRITE A CHAPTER BOOK VERSUS A PICTURE BOOK:

  1. Length of the Book – In a chapter book, the author has room for more words. I tried to keep each of the ten chapters of my book to approximately five hundred words each. That was a general rule I used for my own planning purposes but I think it helped to keep each chapter on track. And in picture books, I aim for the sweet spot of approximately five hundred words. So just by doing the math, it is apparent that I would tell a story much differently in 500 words rather than 5000 words. I liked the longer format a chapter book afforded me to tell this story.
  2. Age of the Characters – My main characters are nine-year-old twins. Generally, young readers enjoy reading about characters who are a bit older than they are. The book is geared to children ages 5-8, with the main characters falling just above that mark. This older age of the main characters fits in perfectly with a chapter book structure.
  3. Age of the Reader – In a chapter book, the reader can be a bit older and may be more sophisticated than the reader of a picture book. The sweet spot for picture books is generally 3-5 years old. The sweet spot for chapter books is generally 5-8 year olds. These ages tend to fluctuate and the lines get blurry, but that’s how I categorize them in my mind. Writing for each age group has its rewards, you just have to know your audience.
  4. Number of Characters – The common wisdom is that the fewer the characters the better in a picture book. Picture book writers generally stick to a few characters so that the plot is tightly woven. In a chapter book, that general number of characters can expand. In my book, the main characters are twins. Plus, I include their grandmother and her dog Molly, and then Jessie and her two sisters Anna and Pauline, and finally Jack. They all had some character development (some more than others) and I had the time and word count to include relevant details and dialogue to shape them. In a picture book, there just isn’t the word count, the attention span of the young reader, or the availability of plot to include so many characters.
  5. Complexity of the Plot – A picture book usually focuses tightly on one problem or issue, and one or two characters who are somehow growing or changing. That is enough for the young reader who is the target audience for the picture book. In contrast, a chapter book’s plot can be more complex, and can have more sub-plots, twists, and turns.
  6. Dependence on Illustrations – Whereas the magic in a picture book comes from the meeting of the text and the illustrations, in a chapter book the magic usually comes mostly from the text. The chapter book illustrator enhances the story and helps bring the story to life, but usually there are only a few full-page and/or spot illustrations per chapter. The book is not dependent on illustration as a picture book is (hence the difference in title between a picture book and a chapter book).
  7. Dialogue – A picture book usually doesn’t have excessive dialogue because there is a potential for the characters to just seem like “talking heads.” Of course there are exceptions and there can be dialogue-heavy PBs, but generally I try to keep PB dialogue to a minimum. In contrast, chapter books are filled with more dialogue and description as they present a well-rounded view of the characters and plot.
  8. Enough Material for Ten Chapters – A typical chapter book is broken down into ten chapters. Ask yourself these questions: do you have enough story to fill in these chapters? Does your story arc have a complete and satisfying beginning, middle, and ending? Or could you condense the story into approximately 500 words that will be enriched by illustrations? Also, try to make sure that each chapter has a mini story arc with a beginning, middle, and end, and the transition to the next chapter contains a small cliff-hanger to help the reader maintain interest.
  9. Writing Time – Because chapter books are longer and the plots are more complex, the author can spend more time with the characters and plot (of course writing picture books and chapter books both take tremendous time in the brainstorming, writing, and re-writing phases). In my case, I love my chapter book characters and this story line so I’m happy to have more time with them. I enjoyed fleshing out their emotions, their characteristics, details about their appearance and dress, their dialogue, and their adventures.
  10. Series Potential – I know that an author is not supposed to be concerned with series potential when writing a picture book or a chapter book. However, I must admit that when writing THE ENCHANTED SNOW GLOBE COLLECTION, I did think about, well . . . a collection! I envisioned twins shaking many snow globes in their grandmother’s collection, and each time they did, they would be transported to a different time period and location. When writing a picture book, I might think, wow, this could really lend itself to a sequel. In fact, SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH is my debut picture book being published by Clear Fork Publishing in 2018, and I’m hard at work writing the sequel. But I would not envision designing a whole picture book series.

So there you have it . . . ten factors to consider when deciding whether your story is more suitable to a picture book or a chapter book. And of course, these are my top ten factors . . . you might have your own distinct top ten. Whatever you decide, make sure you set yourself up for success: work closely with your critique partners; hone your craft by participating in writing classes such as The Children’s Book Academy Chapter Book Alchemist, and writing communities such as the 12 x 12 Picture Book Writing Challenge, The Chapter Book Challenge, The Debut Picture Book Study Group, KidLit411, and many others; join the SCBWI and your local SCBWI chapter; and immerse yourself in the world of children’s books. Reading, writing, and being part of the KidLit community has truly inspired my work – and it’s been so much fun as well! Melissa book

I look forward to reading your books, and I know that whatever format you choose, it will be the best one for you.

_ _ _

Thanks, Alayne! I loved being featured on your blog. And I’m excited to read more of your upcoming chapter books and picture books!

_ _ _

Alayne: Thank you, Melissa! I look forward to reading more of your work as well.

 

Melissa head shot  About Melissa:

Melissa Stoller is the author of the debut chapter book THE ENCHANTED SNOW GLOBE COLLECTION: RETURN TO CONEY ISLAND (Clear Fork Publishing, July 2017); the debut picture book SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH (Clear Fork, March, 2018); and THE ENCHANTED SNOW GLOBE COLLECTION: THE LIBERTY BELL TRAIN RIDE (Clear Fork, April 2018).  She is also the co-author of THE PARENT-CHILD BOOK CLUB: CONNECTING WITH YOUR KIDS THROUGH READING (HorizonLine Publishing, 2009). Melissa is a Regional Ambassador for The Chapter Book Challenge, an Admin for The Debut Picture Book Study Group, an Assistant for Mira Reisberg’s Children’s Book Academy, and a volunteer with SCBWI-MetroNY. Melissa writes parenting articles, and has worked as a lawyer, legal writing instructor, and early childhood educator. She lives in New York City with her husband, three daughters, and one puppy. When not writing or reading, she can be found exploring NYC with family and friends, travelling, and adding treasures to her collections. Find Melissa online at www.MelissaStoller.com, MelissaBergerStoller (Facebook),  @MelissaStoller (Twitter), and Melissa_Stoller (Instagram).

 

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